Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Georgia Wildlife Federation’s Atlanta Buckarama Is Back For the 27th Year!

Deer hunting season may be more than a month away, but the festivities begin in August. For 27 years, hunters from all over the state have marked the Georgia Wildlife Federation’s Atlanta Buckarama as the unofficial beginning of deer season.

“This is an opportunity for sportsmen and women to get together with each other for a good time and fellowship with something for the whole family,” said Sam Stowe, Sportsman’s Program Manager for the Georgia Wildlife Federation.

One of the top shows in the nation, the Buckarama features products from hundreds of vendors across the globe, highlighting the latest in hunting, fishing and outdoor sporting products. This year, CVA Muzzleloaders continues their 20-year partnership in sponsoring the Buckarama and GLOCK has signed on as the official handgun of the show.

More than 20,000 sportsmen and women are expected to attend this year’s show, which will be held Aug. 5-7 at the Atlanta Expo Center North. The Perry Buckarama will be held Aug. 19-21 at the Georgia National Fairgrounds.

As always, the show will feature a number of activities for children, as well as guest appearances and seminars. This year, former Atlanta Braves catcher Charlie O’brien will be a featured guest. O’brien, also an avid hunter, will conduct a seminar along with Todd Wofford of Charlie O’ Products. Nashville Star season 2 winner Brad Cotter will be on hand to meet and greet visitors. Other seminars include Jason Clark’s snake show, the Georgia Falconry Association, and Field Trial Retrievers with Roy Coffee.

The Georgia Wildlife Federation also hosts The Buckarama Deer Head Competition, encouraging contestants to bring their deer head in to compete for the $1,000 grand prize. The heads will be displayed and judged throughout the weekend and certificates will be awarded on Sunday. There are many “Best of” categories as well, including for youth and ladies.Both the Perry and Atlanta Buckaramas are presented by The Georgia Wildlife Federation, the state’s oldest member-supported conservation organization and the state affiliate of the National Wildlife Federation. Since 1936, the Federation’s work in politics, environmental education and sportsmen and women’s issues has shaped every aspect of Georgia’s diverse environmental landscape and give them a strong reputation for conservation success.